Design-challenged

With due respect to the “challenged” individuals who have impediments or roadblocks to performing certain tasks… some days, I feel like I am design-challenged. I may have a fair amount of understanding about a particular design goal and how it might be realized, but I can’t do the design.

To clarify, I operate in a couple of technical domains.  I’m doing fine in one (computer systems, especially computer software). But in the other, I have a sense of extreme frustration. Basically, I can’t do aerospace vehicle design.

I’ve come to the conclusion that to do reasonable design work, you need the appropriate 3D mechanical CAD tools, combined with simulation capability, such as static structural analysis, fluid flow, and thermal conductivity. Back of the envelope computation doesn’t cut it for a design that can be built.

What’s the problem with the CAD tools? They cost on the order of $7,000 for CAD and simulation capability. An aspiring designer cannot afford these tools. (This is not the same as having AutoCAD or Sketch-Up for drafting and design.) From here, the CAD system may generate instructions for manufacturing. In fact, for a more coordinated environment of design tools, database, and interface to manufacturing, the software tools may cost $50,000.

These tools are part of a design workflow. Other components of the workflow might include trajectory design and analysis, high fidelity CFD, design of the fuel system. For a vehicle design to work, the different parts of the workflow need to be able to talk to each other. That is, there are data formats and possibly signals agreed upon between tools.

All this introduces a set of workflow challenges. That is, the design-challenged individual may also be workflow-challenged.

To better size up the problem for a small aerospace entrepreneur, I’m hosting a session on “Aerospace Workflow Challenges” at the Hacker Dojo on June 29. I have more notes on the expectations of the session here.